Frequently Asked Questions

  1. Can Built-in Vacuum Systems be installed in existing homes?
  2. Can Built-in Vacuums be installed by yourself?
  3. Does the power unit have to be vented outside?
  4. How many inlets are required in the average home?
  5. Why is it not practical to put Wall Inlet Valves in every room?
  6. Will our hoses work with other brands?
  7. Is 2" O.D. tubing standard in Central Vacuum Cleaners?
  8. Is the piping the plumber carries the same?
  9. Will our system work in a home with existing 22" PVC?
  10. How much tubing do you need? How do you figure out what is needed?
  11. Is there any loss of suction or air-flow with the amount of tubing installed?
  12. What is the difference between electrified and non-electrified hoses?What about installing the vacuum cleaner unit in a closet?
  13. What about installing the vacuum cleaner unit in a closet?
  14. Where is the most common place to install the vacuum power unit?
  15. What actually activates the unit?
  16. Do I need an electrician to connect my vacuum to a special circuit?
  17. What if my children touch the contacts inside the Wall Inlet Valve?
  18. What if I decide to move?
  19. What is a VacPan
  20. What if the system gets blocked? This is probably the most frequently asked question.
Can Built-in Vacuum Systems be installed in existing homes?

Yes, Central Vacuum Systems can be installed in existing and new homes without costly alterations.

Can Built-in Vacuums be installed by yourself?

The majority of Central Vacuum Systems customers are self-installed. Should you wish to install the system yourself a full installation instructions are provided.

Does the power unit have to be vented outside?

To enjoy the full benefit of a Healthy Home it is recommended that the Power Unit be vented when installed inside the house. However, it is not necessary if installed in a garage. You may wish to consider an inexpensive Exhaust muffler to further reduce the Power Unit noise.

How many inlets are required in the average home?

The main factor is that you need to be able to reach every corner of your home with the 30 foot Central Vacuum Hose. A rule of thumb is 1 inlet valve per 1,000 square feet of area. You may wish to consider your attic area as well when deciding how many inlets you require. Longer length hoses are also available for homes that extra Inlet Valve is not very practical.

Why is it not practical to put Wall Inlet Valves in every room?

You unnecessarily increase both material and labour costs. Also, convenience is lost because you are retracing your steps to unplug and reconnect the hose more than is necessary.

Will our hoses work with other brands?

Our hoses are made to Industry Standards and will fit almost all of our competitors' wall valves. The hose wall end cuff measures 1.5" (outside diameter).

Is 2" O.D. tubing standard in Central Vacuum Cleaners?

Yes, 2" O.D. (outside diameter) is the optimum size pipe for central vacuums. Please note: To ensure trouble-free operation the use of regular plumbing schedule pipe is NOT recommended. The specifications for Central Vacuum PVC pipe are: 2" (outside diameter), 0.065" wall thickness.

Is the piping the plumber carries the same?

No. Husky manufactures piping to exact standards and tolerances for vacuum purposes only. The plumbing pipe is not suitable. It may cause clogging, poor airflow and reduced efficiency.

Will our system work in a home with existing 2" PVC?

Yes, competition is 100% 2" tubing, and has always been, except for a few early models. Our vacuum cleaner unit is 100% compatible with competitors' 2" tubing.

How much tubing do you need? How do you figure out what is needed?

An average of slightly over 20ft of pipe for each inlet valve installed. This figure could change depending upon the house type and should only be used as a reference.

Is there any loss of suction or air-flow with the amount of tubing installed?

The amount of tubing installed in the average home is approximately 40ft. When a system is installed with increased footage up to 250ft, it will be necessary to use a larger power unit to maintain the excellent suction and airflow.

What is the difference between electrified and non-electrified hoses?

Electrified hose has 240-volt cord moulded into it for use with the electric powerhead. Non-electrified hose would be used with an air-driven powerhead or on straight suction carpet/floor tools.

What about installing the vacuum cleaner unit in a closet?

Yes, with proper ventilation.

Where is the most common place to install the vacuum power unit?

Basements and garages are the most common areas for installing the unit. Keep in mind that installing the unit in a garage offers extra advantages: 1) Noise outside; 2) Remove dirt outside; 3) Cleans car/garage.

What actually activates the unit?

Insertion of the hose end into the inlet valve connects two 24 volt voltage contact points and automatically starts the vacuum. Another feature offered is an on/off button which provides a backup if for some reason your 24 volt system requires maintenance.

Do I need an electrician to connect my vacuum to a special circuit?

No, all our Power Units can be plugged into normal house service outlets

What if my children touch the contacts inside the Wall Inlet Valve?

Low voltage system is only 24 volt dc. Very similar to that used with speakers or security system and it is totally safe with your children

What if I decide to move?

Central Vacuum Systems adds value to your home, and you should get your investment back when you move. However, Our system is designed to detach so that you can take it with you if you wish.

What is a VacPan

A VacPan is an automatic dustpan that is connected to your Central Vacuum System. Popular in kitchens, bathrooms, workshops... anywhere frequent sweeping is needed. You just open the valve with your foot, sweep dirt and debris into the opening and your Husky takes care of the rest.

What if the system gets blocked? This is probably the most frequently asked question.

The answer is that if you follow the installation instructions properly, it won't. If anything is going to get stuck, it will be immediately behind the socket where it reaches the 90 degree elbow. The rest of the system consists of swept, 45 degree bends - so anything that can get round the 90 degree bend will pass through the rest of the pipework to the vacuum unit. To remove the blockage just pull the hose out from the socket and the blockage can easily be removed.

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